June 2016 Meeting: Technologies for Hearing and Listening

The next meeting of the AES Melbourne Section will be on Monday 6th June at 7:30pm at:
The SAE Institute Lecture Theatre, 235 Normanby Rd, South Melbourne.

Prof Peter Blamey will present on the topic

 Technologies for Hearing and Listening.

Hearing aids have evolved over time from passive ear trumpets through electronic amplifiers to miniature low energy computers that implement intelligent sound processing algorithms and communicate wirelessly with other devices. 

This talk will cover the underlying technologies that have driven this evolution, the benefits they bring to users of hearing aids, and how they affect the listening experience.

Details:
Mon 6th June 2016 at 7:30pm
-at-
The SAE Institute – Lecture Theatre
235 Normanby Road
South Melbourne

Visitors and guests welcome.

 

Directions:  Entry to SAE is via the Students’ Entry, now located in Woodgate St (at rear of building). 
Please report to the Supervisor’s Desk at this entry, and you will be directed to the Lecture Theatre (upstairs at the back of the building).
For those not yet familiar with the Woodgate St entrance, this map and photo may help (the entrance is deliberately low-key).

About Prof Blamey
Peter has a PhD in physics and began working on hearing when he became a member of Graeme Clark’s cochlear implant research team in 1979. He is a coauthor on over 200 papers on hearing, sound processing, speech and language of children with impaired hearing, and psychophysics. He is an inventor of 25 patent families for hearing aids, bionic ears and bionic eyes.
He has been instrumental in the spin-off and incubation of 4 companies from the Bionics Institute since 2000, including Dynamic Hearing that has provided advanced signal processing technologies in many millions of hearing aids globally.
Peter is an Executive Director and co-owner of Blamey Saunders Hears, a company addressing the poor penetration of the hearing aid market in order to reduce the $12 billion annual burden of hearing loss in Australia.

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